Tag Archives: Verizon

OpenStack Targets Edge Computing, Launches OpenDev Event

OpenStack has become the clear open source choice for turning organizations’ data centers into private clouds. But now OpenStack is looking beyond the data center and out towards Edge Computing.

OpenStack’ 16th (and latest) release, codenamed Pike, puts emphasis on composable infrastructure which is stated to “make possible use cases like edge computing and NFV“. While Network Function Virtualization (NFV) has been picking up at OpenStack over the last years with good traction in the Telecommunications industry, edge computing hasn’t been properly addressed so far. Now OpenStack is set to change that.

OpenStack organized OpenDev 2017 conference last month in San Francisco to “advance the future of EDGE computing“. The event drew much attention with participants from over 30 organizations. Seeing the great interest in Edge Computing in the Telecoms industry it wasn’t surprising to see at OpenDev major Telecoms carriers such as Verizon, AT&T and NTT (which last month founded with Toyota and others an Automotive Edge Computing Consortium), as well as vendors such as Intel, VMware, Ericsson, Red Hat and Huawei. Besides the Telecom industry you could see at OpenDev retail giants such as eBay and Wallmart and others.

OpenDev-2017-edgecomputing

OpenStack also collaborates with other edge computing groups such as Open Edge Computing and The European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI).

While OpenStack promotes a private cloud approach to edge computing, the public cloud vendors are also targeting edge computing. The battle between private and public cloud options which began at the centralized cloud will surely continue on to the edge as well.

Here are a few of the interesting bits from OpenDev 2017:

Verizon‘s Beth Cohen presented Verizon’s Virtual Network Services offering cloud-based services such as Software-Defined WAN (SD-WAN), security, and routing at a uCPE “OpenStack in a Box” at customer premises:

AT&T‘s Kandan Kathirvel and Rodolfo Pacheco talked about telco challenges such as supporting massive scale of millions of edge nodes, and presented AT&T’s prototyped solution, based entirely on open source such as Google’s Kubernetes and ONAP orchestration (based on AT&T’s ECOMP merged with OPEN-O under Linux Foundation):

Jonathan Bryce from OpenStack Foundation shared on his keynote more on OpenStack’s view and plans for edge computing:

For more information on OpenStack’s Edge Computing click here.

For more information on OpenDev 2017 click here.

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Can Hybrid Cloud Present An Alternative To Amazon, Microsoft, Google?

It’s not easy to be a public cloud vendor these days. The public cloud world has been undergoing serious consolidation in the past few years. Amazon, the pioneer of the cloud, has been keeping a clear lead, while Microsoft and Google have been pulling in, utilizing their accumulated experience, global data centers and software platforms, and positioned themselves as next in line. Together this trio serve the vast majority of the workloads running on public cloud.

This consolidation drove out many vendors, including some big incumbent names such as HP that shut down its cloud late last year and Verizon that did the same a couple of months ago.

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So what’s their answer? I’d say it’s threefold:

  1. Multi-cloud model: If you can’t beat them, join them. Support Amazon, Microsoft, Google public clouds. If done via a good generic platform, it can help avoid vendor lock-in.
  2. Hybrid model: mix the public cloud support with support for private cloud and bare-metal to offer public-private-hosted hybrid approach.
  3. Private model: concentrate on strictly private cloud. The popular open-source project OpenStack is a leading candidate for this strategy. This approach is useful for the customers insisting to run things on their own premises.

HP (now HPE), after shutting down its public cloud, moved to a hybrid cloud strategy with a series of acquisitions and by endorsing OpenStack private cloud open source project.  Verizon went for the private cloud approach.

An interesting case is Rackspace, which eased off on its own cloud and managed services, and started offering third-party support for the public clouds of Amazon and Microsoft, leveraging its Fanatical Support brand. Also, in parallel to supporting leading public cloud vendors, Rackspace keeps its longstanding support of private cloud deployments based on OpenStack, the popular open-source platform which it co-founded.

rackspace-multi-cloud-offering

Rackspace’s strategy seems to have hit well. quarterly results published this week show quarterly revenue $518 million, up 7.9% from the year-ago-quarter. Executives noted Rackspace’s success was buoyed particularly by a growing number of Fanatical Support customers for its Microsoft Azure and Amazon Web Services (AWS) offerings as well as customers on its OpenStack private cloud.

Hybrid cloud strategies gain traction with enterprises. While Amazon, Microsoft and Google try to convince enterprises to go all-in on the public cloud, it’s too big a change to swallow for most. Even Microsoft realized that hurdle and tried bringing its Azure cloud to the enterprise’s datacenter. Hybrid cloud seems to have demand, and may also be the focus of those who failed to take the lead in the public cloud.

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Verizon Shutting Down Its Public Cloud

Verizon has officially decided to shut down the majority of its public cloud operation. In an announcement sent to its cloud customers, which hit waves in the social media, it announced decision to “discontinue its Public Cloud, Reserve Performance and Marketplace services on April the 12th”, leaving their customers 2 months to migrate their data to another safe haven before it disappears together with the cloud services.

The company is offering its Virtual Private Cloud services as an alternative, which indicates Verizon will now focus its cloud offering on private cloud, probably aimed at enterprises.

Verizon is not alone in its decision. Last October HP made a similar choice to quit the public cloud, and so has Dell. The reason for their decision is the harsh price competition in the public cloud arena, led by Amazon who controls the vast majority of this market, and followed by Microsoft, Google and IBM. In addition to very competitive prices for their infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS), these leading vendors also offer an ever-growing plethora of platform services (PaaS) which ease the development on the cloud.

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Traditionally enterprises have utilized Verizon and the likes for reliable high-quality networking. But the public cloud players quickly stepped up and provided next-generation networking, same as they did with compute and storage (on the expense of HP, Dell and the likes), and gained foothold with enterprises. Even the very conservative banking sector is now going for public cloud with these guys.

Another important advantage of the leading vendors is their global geographical presence, with which local vendors find hard to compete. We are expected to see further consolidation in the public cloud, with traditional enterprise vendors increasingly pressed to innovate and reinvent themselves. IBM is one such good example.We’ll see who else stays relevant in the public cloud age.

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