Prometheus Joins Google’s Kubernetes In Cloud Native Computing Foundation

Last August the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) was founded by important names such as Google, CoreOS, Docker, Weaveworks, Mesosphere and others, and was hosted under the Linux Foundation. The first contribution to CNCF was Kubernetes, which Google open-sourced for that end, and served as the cornerstone of CNCF’s open source stack.

Last week CNCF accepted its second project: Prometheus. Prometheus is a monitoring and alerting toolkit backed by a powerful time series database. Such monitoring and alerting is an important part of any large-scale system, which a cloud-native reference architecture needs to address. Kubernetes and Prometheus already play well together, as Kubernetes exposes Prometheus metrics natively. Nonetheless, Prometheus supports many other monitoring targets and service discovery integrations, from Graphite and Consul to simple SNMP and JMX that enable open-ended and custom integrations.

prometheus_ui_fragments-heap-zoom-cbb0dc4ffce

Unlike Kubernetes at the time, Prometheus is already open source and backed by an active community. Among the impressive users of Prometheus you’d find several members of CNCF such as Google, CoreOS, Docker and Weaveworks, which probably made its acceptance easier. In its announcement Prometheus team said:

By joining the CNCF, we hope to establish a clear and sustainable project governance model, as well as benefit from the resources, infrastructure, and advice that the independent foundation provides to its members.

Another candidate to join CNCF is Data Center Operating System (DC/OS), which was open-sourced by Mesosphere last month. Seeing that Mesosphere is a founding member of CNCF, it’s reasonable to estimate they’d host DC/OS there. With an active community of more than 60 partner companies, this could be a serious tail wind for the foundation.

So who’s next in line for Cloud Native Computing Foundation?

1311765722_picons03 Follow Horovits on Twitter!

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Cloud, DevOps

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s